Saudi Arabia rejects interference in its internal policies, says the kingdom’s representative to UN

Dr. Abdul Aziz Al-Wasel, KSA envoy to UN

Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the United Nations in Geneva Dr. Abdulaziz Al-Wasil affirmed that the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is pursuing well-established reform policies that conform to its basic principles and Islamic pillars, particularly with regard to women’s rights and enhancing their role in the public life.

Dr. Al-Wasil stressed that the Kingdom enjoys a solid and independent judiciary system that handles all cases in accordance with the rulings of Islamic Sharia and the country’s judicial regulations.

Before the Human Rights Council in Geneva, the Saudi ambassador to the United Nations said that “the delegation of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has listened with disapproval to the statement made by Australia, on behalf of a group of States, as it holds a number of misinformation and fallacies against my country.

In this regard, we categorically reject interference of any state in the Kingdom’s internal policies, as we emphasize the sovereignty and independence of its judicial institutions.”

On behalf of 78 states before the 40th Human Rights Council with regard to 7th provision, Dr. Al-Wasil expressed concern over horrific violations of the rights of minorities, immigrants and Muslims as well as the racist and extremist policies, adding that “these policies and practices are unfortunately popular and accepted by some western parliaments and are even sponsored by governments in some countries that lecture on human rights in this room.”

He asserted that exacerbation of extremism against Muslims, racism and hatred against foreigners and minorities has been a natural consequence of the inaction and sympathy of some governments, such as Australia and other Western countries, with this racist approach.

“This Council should highlight Australia’s internal policy on immigration, refugees and deportation, which is one of the most egregious racist policies in the 21st century,” Dr. Al-Wasil said, adding that the government of Australia has failed to set a comprehensive national plan to address these issues and other Western countries have been reluctant to urge Australia to abandon this racist approach.

“It is time to review the Human Rights Council’s resolution No. 16/18, “combating intolerance, negative stereotyping and stigmatization of, and discrimination, incitement to violence and violence against persons based on religion or belief,” he said, calling upon the states, particularly the Human Rights Council, to exert more efforts to take a clear international stance towards this issue in order to prevent practices of hatred and extremism in the world.